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11 Shoppers Share What It's Like At Supermarkets Across The Country During The COVID-19 Pandemic

11 Shoppers Share What It's Like At Supermarkets Across The Country During The COVID-19 Pandemic

By Sarah Weinberg, Deputy Editor, Sarah Weinberg Is The Deputy Editor At Delish, Has Covered Food, Travel, Home, Lifestyle For A Number Of Publications, Including Food Network Magazine, Country Living.

Jonathan; San Jose, CA

I live in a "hot spot," and I think where you live plays in to how you approach things. Having pretty much depleted my initial panic purchases of one case each of refried beans, black beans, and canned corn, I've started venturing back out for less apocalyptic shopping items. Being predominantly vegetarian/pescatarian brings some challenges—in an apocalypse I'll eat frozen vegetables and fruit, but I'd rather not, given the option. So I use a combination of Instacart for major shopping and "dash-and-go" for fresh or last minute needs. For the latter, I have a list of rules for whether I will go in to a market: Can I get in and out in less than 10 minutes. and can I do it with physical distancing? Are they wiping down the shopping carts out front? Are the staff using proper protocols (masks, gloves, etc.)? Are the customers wearing masks and trying to practice social distancing? Do they have the exact items I am looking for (I prefer to go to my regular markets because I know where everything is and don't have to hunt for items, which takes more time)?

My first scan is to see how crowded the parking lot is. I'm okay with turning around and walking out if I don't feel comfortable. At this point I feel like my local market is pretty much back to "normal" with respect to availability of products. Most people behave, but it only takes one to "contaminate" the scene. They have plexiglass, gloves, masks, and taped-off markers. I do my best to mind my own business. That said, I glared at the woman behind me who broke the 6-foot rule (I don't think she noticed but I felt better for the glare), and told the bagger I'd bag things myself because "wearing a mask under your nose is like not wearing a mask." Fortunately I bagged a bottle of vodka.